From displacement to hope
Yazidi family resumes life

August 3, 2018 at 8:45 am

Gullstan says they have more time with her husband due to their new project. Photo: Paula Piccone, UNDP

Gullstan says they have more time with her husband due to their new project. Photo: Paula Piccone, UNDP

Sirwan Hussein
“The crisis was disastrous; we were hopeless, but now we live with dignity,” a Yazidi woman said after returning home.
According to a report by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), hope and stability have gradually and unexpectedly returned to a Yazidi family, through a project started with their help.
Gullstan, 23, lives in al-Qosh, north of Nineveh, a town populated by Christians and Yazidis. When the Islamic State (ISIL) approached the town, she left with her husband, Nashwan, 27 and 14 other members of the family, urgently.
After months of displacement in Duhok, neighbouring Nineveh, they returned. However, life proved to be difficult for them back then.
Gullstan said, “We were struggling to acquire our needs when we returned, depending on relative’s aids. We really had a hard time.”
After UNDP provided 250 birds for them, everything changed. They developed the project through the help of the Agriculture College of Duhok, an NGO named Small Village of Zakho, and German funds.

The family has sold, so far, 10 thousand bird eggs. Photo: Paula Piccone, UNDP

The family has sold, so far, 10 thousand bird eggs. Photo: Paula Piccone, UNDP

The UNDP project covered 900 families in Nineveh, especially the returned refugees, to have a source of income through poultry, farming and fishing.
She said, “The crisis was disastrous; we were hopeless, but now we live with dignity.”
Since late last year, the family has sold 260 birds and 10 thousand eggs in the local markets.
While skimming the notebook he dedicated to follow the business, Nashwan said, “We earn around 250 USD each month.”
That is enough to provide for them, and now they can buy food, clothes, fuel and more health care. They no longer need their relatives.

When he was unemployed, he was rarely home. However, since we have started this project, he has more time to spend with me.

“When he was unemployed, he was rarely home. However, since we have started this project, he has more time to spend with me,” Gullstand said about her husband, “We both support each other, and I believe our relationship turns stronger. I’m pleased that I can contribute to the expenses of the family.”
Nashwan prefered his wife to manage the financial affairs, “She knows better about our needs.”
Those who left al-Qosh in fear of ISIL, are gradually returning, even those who went abroad.
Nashwan said, “My brother fled to Germany to have a safer life. When I discussed the poultry project, he devised a plan to return.”

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